16.10 - Fully Qualified Object Names - Teradata Database

Teradata Database SQL Fundamentals

Product
Teradata Database
Release Number
16.10
Release Date
June 2017
Content Type
Programming Reference
Publication ID
B035-1141-161K
Language
English (United States)

A fully qualified object name includes the names of all parent objects up to the level of the containing database. A common use case is a fully qualified column name, which consists of a database name, table name, and column name.

database_name
A qualifying name for the database in which the table and column being referenced is stored.
Depending on the ambiguity of the reference, database_name might or might not be required.
table_name
A qualifying name for the table in which the column being referenced is stored.
Depending on the ambiguity of the reference, table_name might or might not be required.
column_name
One of the following:
  • The name of the column being referenced
  • The alias of the column being referenced
  • The keyword PARTITION

Name Resolution Rules and the Need to Fully Qualify a Name

  • Name resolution is performed statement by statement.
  • An ambiguous unqualified name returns an error to the requestor.
  • When an INSERT statement contains a subquery, names are resolved in the subquery first.
  • Names in a view are resolved when the view is created.
  • Names in a macro data manipulation statement are resolved when the macro is created.
  • Names in a macro data definition statement are resolved when the macro is performed using the default database of the user submitting the EXECUTE statement.

    Therefore, you should fully qualify all names in a macro data definition statement, unless you specifically intend for the user’s default to be used.

  • Names in stored procedure statements are resolved either when the procedure is created or when the procedure is executed, depending on whether the CREATE PROCEDURE statement includes the SQL SECURITY clause and which option the clause specifies.

    Whether unqualified object names acquire the database name of the creator, invoker, or owner of the stored procedure also depends on whether the CREATE PROCEDURE statement includes the SQL SECURITY clause and which option the clause specifies.